Why "all laser" HD LASIK laser eye surgery?

30
Mar

Why "all laser" HD LASIK laser eye surgery?

Wondering where to go for your laser eye surgery? With the combination of our iFS femtosecond laser and the latest technologically advanced Schwind Amaris 1050RS excimer laser we take care of safety, comfort and precision for your laser eye surgery, with High Definition LASIK.



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At Fendalton Eye Clinic the first step of your HD LASIK laser eye surgery, creating the corneal flap, is achieved with the iFS femtosecond laser.
A high definition result can only be achieved with the precision, safety and accuracy of an "all laser" LASIK procedure. NASA and US Military only approves blade-less "all laser" laser eye surgery. They do not approve personnel having the LASIK flap cut with a bladed microkeratome, a bladed microkertome is still used by other LASIK providers in Christchurch, be sure that you are receiving HD LASIK by having your laser eye surgery with Dr David Kent at Fendalton Eye CLinic. Research has shown that creating the corneal flap with a femtosecond laser is the only way to ensure long term stability of the cornea to withstand a combat environment, high altititude and sudden changes in air pressure. So you can have peace of mind that your laser eye surgery at Fendalton Eye Clinic is the safest procedure in New Zealand. Find out more about HD LASIK



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Safety and precision with HD LASIK laser eye surgery

HD LASIK laser eye surgery can only be achieved by utilising a femtosecond laser in the first step of the LASIK procedure, to create the corneal flap then the Schwind Amaris excimer laser can reshape the inner layers of the cornea to achieve the desired focusing change. A femtosecond laser is far more accurate in creating a flap of even thickness during your laser eye surgery compared to a bladed microkeratome cutting a corneal flap. A laser created corneal flap is more precise and safer than a bladed microkeratome cutting a flap. A mircokeratome, used by some clinics can place your eye at greater risk of complications produced by the blade such as a "button hole", partial flap or irregular flap.


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